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National Water Account 2018

South East Queensland: Water access and use

  • Almost 90% of the region's surface water allocations are for urban water supply, primarily for residential use.
  • Surface water allocation and diversion were both very similar to last year.

Diagram showing percentages of water allocated for individual user and urban use, total surface water allocations volume and total groundwater allocation volume for the South East Queensland region for the 2017–18 year.

For further information on water rights and water use within the region during the year scroll down this page or click on the links below:

 

Water rights and use

Image of Wivenhoe Lake © Habibur Rahman

Surface water rights

Figure S10 Surface water access allocations and diversions in the South East Queensland region for the last seven years
Figure S10 Surface water access allocations and diversions in the South East Queensland region for the last seven years

 

  • Allocations for surface water diversion to the urban water system were very similar to the previous year.
  • Total diversions were also similar to last year, likely due to similar dry conditions for most months of the year.

 

Groundwater rights

Figure S11 Groundwater access allocations and extractions in the South East Queensland region for the last seven years
Figure S11 Groundwater access allocations and extractions in the South East Queensland region for the last seven years

 

  • Groundwater allocations remained unchanged from last year.
  • Groundwater extraction for individual users (both allocated and non-allocated) increased from last year. The increase is predominantly in the Lockyer Valley area, likely due to dry conditions for most months of the year.

  

Water market activity

Image of Brisbane River and CBD (istock © zstockphotos)

 

  • All trade or lease of water access entitlements or allocations is for surface water only.
  • The volume of surface water allocation and entitlement traded is small, typically representing about 1% of the total surface water allocation.
  • For more information on water markets in the region, see the Water Markets Dashboard.

 

Cultural and environmental water

Gwongorool Pool, Lamington National Park (© Greg Keir)

 

Cultural benefit

  • The Gold Coast, Moreton, Mary Basin and Logan Basin water plans define general and ecological outcomes, and outline strategies to achieve these outcomes. This includes water for social and cultural benefits.
 

Environmental benefit

Environmental water provisions

  • Environmental water provisions in all four water plan areas (Gold Coast, Moreton, Mary Basin, and Logan Basin) include the protection of low, medium to high, and seasonal flow components of the flow regime. These components of the flow regime are all important for maintaining the natural ecological processes in the region.
  • Environmental flow requirements have been established for each component of the flow regime through modeling and are designed to maintain the specific ecological objectives provided in the four water plans.
  • Water for environmental benefit in the South East Queensland region is provided according to two different water management scenarios: planned, partly regulated surface water and planned, unregulated surface water.

 

Partly regulated surface water
  • Environmental water provisions under the partly regulated scenario are in place for the Nerang Water Supply Scheme (Gold Coast water plan area), Baroon Pocket Water Supply Scheme (Mary Basin water plan area), Logan Water Supply Scheme (Logan Basin water plan area), and the Central Brisbane River, Stanley River, and Cressbrook Creek water supply schemes (Moreton water plan area).

 

Unregulated surface water
  • Environmental water provisions under the unregulated scenario are in place for all four water plan areas.

 

Environmental water outcomes

  • The environmental outcomes under the four water plans listed above have been derived in consideration of the current state of the water resources in the respective plan areas, recognising that the natural state of the water courses, lakes and springs has changed because of water infrastructure, flow supplementation and water use.
  • Environmental outcomes are generally assessed over a longer time frame and combine streamflow, water supply scheme and ecological research data.