How To Play The Radar Loops

Loop Controls

The loop controls allow you to play the series of images in a loop, or to step through them one image at a time. By default, when the viewer is first opened, the most recent image is displayed and the loop is animated. You can stop the loop, advance through the images one frame at a time, "sweep" backwards and forwards through the images, as well as control the speed at which you view the images. There is also now a "printer friendly" version of the image available.

Radar map loop
controls

Play button Play Click to "play" or activate the series of images in the loop

 Stop button Stop Click to "stop" the series of images in the loop


Previous button Previous. Click to step back one frame at a time

Next
button Next. Click to step forward one frame at a time

Slow button Slow. Decrease the speed of the animation in the loop of images

Fast
button Fast. Increase the speed of the animation in the loop of images

Sweep button Sweep. Click to move forwards and backwards through the images

Print
button Printer Friendly version. Click to print an image from the loop

You can advance through the loops at a faster or slower speed by pressing the '+' (faster) or '-' (slower) buttons. You can also use the "Sweep" function to move forwards and backwards through the images.

During the loops, if you want to print one of the images, first press the 'Stop' button on the image you wish to print, and then presss the 'printer friendly' button to print the selected image.

Radar Loops

In the radar viewer, radar loops for most of the Bureau's radars have up to 4 of the latest radar images. Images are normally produced every 10 minutes, so a typical loop of 4 images, 10 minutes apart, covers a 30 minute period. The oldest image in the loop is generally 40-50 minutes before the present time. However, if a radar has stopped producing images (due to windfinding duties or breakdown), then images up to two hours old may be shown.

Radar loops for the Brisbane and Melbourne radars have up to 6 of the latest radar images. Images are produced every 6 minutes for these radars, so a loop of 6 images, 6 minutes apart, covers a 30 minute period.

We recommend that you always check the timestamps on the radar images to see the exact time each image was produced. Note that the time shown on the radar image is UTC - this is an international 24 hour time and date standard (Coordinated Universal Time), which is the same as GMT (Greenwich Mean Time). Local times are also shown at the bottom of page.